skip to content

Translational Cognitive Neuroscience Lab

 
Subscribe to Neuroscience Talks in Cambridge feed
A superlist combining individual seminars and series from other lists on talks.cam. These Neuroscience-themed seminars will be advertised throughout the relevant interest group in Cambridge.
Updated: 1 hour 34 min ago

Tue 02 Nov 16:00: The brain control of appetite: Can an old dog teach us new tricks?

Mon, 27/09/2021 - 11:51
The brain control of appetite: Can an old dog teach us new tricks?

Theme: Beyond the Neuron: glia, vascular and immune cells

Abstract: It is clear that the cause of obesity is a result of eating more than you burn. It is physics. What is more complex to answer is why some people eat more than others? Differences in our genetic make-up mean some of us are slightly more hungry all the time and so eat more than others. We now know that the genetics of body-weight, on which obesity sits on one end of the spectrum, is in actuality the genetics of appetite control. In contrast to the prevailing view, body-weight is not a choice. People who are obese are not bad or lazy; rather, they are fighting their biology. Biography: Giles Yeo got his PhD from the University of Cambridge in 1998, after which he joined the lab of Prof Sir Stephen O’Rahilly, working on the genetics of severe human obesity. Giles Yeo is now a programme leader at the MRC Metabolic Diseases Unit in Cambridge and his research currently focuses on the influence of genes on feeding behaviour & body-weight. In addition, he is a graduate tutor and fellow of Wolfson College, and Honorary President of the British Dietetic Association. Giles is also a broadcaster and author, presenting science documentaries for the BBC , and hosts a podcast called ‘Dr Giles Yeo Chews The Fat’. His first book ‘Gene Eating’ was published in December 2018, and his second book ‘Why Calories Don’t Count’ came out in June 2021. Giles was appointed an MBE in the Queen’s 2020 birthday honours for services to ‘Research, Communication and Engagement’.

Register in advance for this seminar: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZwpd-GvrTgiGNyaXkRh-8ixF0bI9ayS-CBr

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Tue 28 Sep 14:00: Computational Neuroscience Journal Club

Sat, 25/09/2021 - 15:45
Computational Neuroscience Journal Club

Please join us for our fortnightly journal club online via zoom where two presenters will jointly present a topic together. The next topic is ‘Brain-computer interfaces’ presented by Marine Schimel and David Liu.

Zoom information: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84958321096?pwd=dFpsYnpJYWVNeHlJbEFKbW1OTzFiQT09 Meeting ID: 841 9788 6178 Passcode: 659046

Summary:

Ever since the first recordings of human brain activity around a century ago, developments in recording techniques have greatly improved the quality, variety and scale of neural data collected in neuroscience experiments. To test and expand our understanding of the brain, one has to perform experiments that involve recording and potentially manipulating activity in live neural populations simultaneously with behaviour and/or sensory input. The relation between the observed activity and the external behaviour or input allows one to characterize the meaning and function of such neural signals. Due to the complexity of neural activity, the analysis of neural data relies on powerful statistical tools and computational methods that run on silicon hardware. When combining all these aspects into a single framework, one naturally arrives at the idea of brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) or brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). Such setups aim to provide, as the name suggests, a direct interface to observe and potentially control neural activity through software. If successful, such constructions open up many new avenues for testing neuroscience theories, exploring neural activity, and more practical applications like reading intended behaviour. We present three papers, covering both theory as well as practical aspects of BMIs, showing their importance in both basic scientific study of the brain as well as potential for medical applications in neurological disorders. As improvements in bio-engineering and neural recording technologies are converging with recent strides in signal processing and machine learning, BMIs are becoming an exciting topic for both science and real-world applications.

Learning by neural reassociation, Golub, M.D., Sadtler, P.T., Oby, E.R. et al., Nature Neuroscience (2018)

Cortical control of virtual self-motion using task-specific subspaces, Schroeder, K.E., Perkins, S.M., Wang, Q., Churchland, M.M., bioRxiv (2020)

High-performance brain-to-text communication via handwriting, Willett, F.R., Avansino, D.T., Hochberg, L.R. et al., Nature (2021)

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Tue 28 Sep 14:00: Computational Neuroscience Journal Club

Sat, 25/09/2021 - 15:40
Computational Neuroscience Journal Club

Please join us for our fortnightly journal club online via zoom where two presenters will jointly present a topic together. The next topic is ‘Brain-computer interfaces presented by Marine Schimel and David Liu.

Zoom information: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84958321096?pwd=dFpsYnpJYWVNeHlJbEFKbW1OTzFiQT09 Meeting ID: 841 9788 6178 Passcode: 659046

Summary:

Ever since the first recordings of human brain activity around a century ago, developments in recording techniques have greatly improved the quality, variety and scale of neural data collected in neuroscience experiments. To test and expand our understanding of the brain, one has to perform experiments that involve recording and potentially manipulating activity in live neural populations simultaneously with behaviour and/or sensory input. The relation between the observed activity and the external behaviour or input allows one to characterize the meaning and function of such neural signals. Due to the complexity of neural activity, the analysis of neural data relies on powerful statistical tools and computational methods that run on silicon hardware. When combining all these aspects into a single framework, one naturally arrives at the idea of brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) or brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). Such setups aim to provide, as the name suggests, a direct interface to observe and potentially control neural activity through software. If successful, such constructions open up many new avenues for testing neuroscience theories, exploring neural activity, and more practical applications like reading intended behaviour. We present three papers, covering both theory as well as practical aspects of BMIs, showing their importance in both basic scientific study of the brain as well as potential for medical applications in neurological disorders. As improvements in bio-engineering and neural recording technologies are converging with recent strides in signal processing and machine learning, BMIs are becoming an exciting topic for both science and real-world applications.

Learning by neural reassociation, Golub, M.D., Sadtler, P.T., Oby, E.R. et al., Nature Neuroscience (2018)

Cortical control of virtual self-motion using task-specific subspaces, Schroeder, K.E., Perkins, S.M., Wang, Q., Churchland, M.M., bioRxiv (2020)

High-performance brain-to-text communication via handwriting, Willett, F.R., Avansino, D.T., Hochberg, L.R. et al., Nature (2021)

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Tue 12 Oct 16:00: Activity dependent myelination: a mechanism for learning and regeneration?

Fri, 24/09/2021 - 13:21
Activity dependent myelination: a mechanism for learning and regeneration?

Theme: Beyond the Neuron: glia, vascular and immune cells

Abstract: The CNS is responsive to an ever-changing environment. Until recently, studies of neural plasticity focused almost exclusively on functional and structural changes of neuronal synapses. In recent years, myelin plasticity has emerged as a potential modulator of neural networks. Myelination of previously unmyelinated axons, and changes in the structure on already-myelinated axons, can have large effects on network function. The heterogeneity of the extent of how axons in the CNS are myelinated offers diverse scope for dynamic myelin changes to fine-tune neural circuits. The traditionally held view of myelin as a passive insulator of axons is now changing to one of lifelong changes in myelin, modulated by neuronal activity and experience.

Myelin, produced by oligodendrocytes (OLs), is essential for normal brain function, as it provides fast signal transmission, promotes synchronization of neuronal signals and helps to maintain neuronal function. OLs differentiate from oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs), which are distributed throughout the adult brain, and myelination continues into late adulthood. OPCs can sense neuronal activity as they receive synaptic inputs from neurons and express voltage-gated ion channels and neurotransmitter receptors, and differentiate into myelinating OLs in response to changes in neuronal activity.

This lecture will explore to what extent myelin plasticity occurs in adult animals, whether myelin changes occur in non-motor learning tasks, especially in learning and memory, and questions whether myelin plasticity and myelin regeneration are two sides of the same coin.

Biography: Ragnhildur Thóra Káradóttir, currently the director of the MS Society Cambridge Centre for Myelin Repair, did her undergraduate degree in Biochemistry at the University of Iceland. For her postgraduate training, she entered the Wellcome Trust 4 year PhD Programme in Neuroscience, at UCL , where she did her PhD with Prof. David Attwell. Immediately, after her PhD she was awarded a Dorothy Hodgkin Fellowship of the Royal Society, and in 2011 she was awarded a Wellcome Trust Career Development Research Fellowship.

Since establishing her lab she has been awarded a number of awards, most recently the Lister Institute Research Prize (one of 5 in the UK), the Allen Distinguished Investigator Award (one of 5 worldwide, first time given outside of USA ) and an ERC consolidator award. In 2015 she was elected to the FENS -Kavli Network of Excellence (one of 20 in Europe) and in 2017 awarded the Fabiane Carvalho Miranda International Prize for the best paper published in the years 2015-2017 in myelin biology and MS related research.

Her main research interest is to understand how neuronal activity can regulate oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) differentiation and myelin plasticity in health and disease. Her new line of research interest is to determine the changes in myelin and myelin repair throughout the lifespan.

Register in advance for this meeting: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZMkdeGpqT0iGdZKPo-TEC25-kWyBwUXhJbA

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Mon 04 Oct 16:00: Microglial and myeloid mechanisms of resilience and repair in cerebrovascular disease This is a live webinar on Zoom using the link indicated above

Fri, 24/09/2021 - 11:00
Microglial and myeloid mechanisms of resilience and repair in cerebrovascular disease

Cerebrovascular disease is one of the most common causes of neurological mortality and morbidity worldwide. In addition to the physical consequences of acute stroke, cerebrovascular dysfunction and pathology causally contribute to cognitive impairment across the spectrum of dementias. Microglia and related myeloid cells are involved in a range of neurovascular interactions and increasing evidence suggests they mediate resilience and adaptive responses to various forms of cerebrovascular disease, both acute and chronic. In this seminar, I will describe our recent work investigating microglial mechanisms of resilience and repair in the context of cerebrovascular disease and highlight the implications for understanding and treating stroke and dementia.

This is a live webinar on Zoom using the link indicated above

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Tue 05 Oct 16:00: From Vulnerable Plaque to Vulnerable Brain: Understanding the Role of Inflammation in Vascular Health, Stroke, and Cerebrovascular Disease

Thu, 23/09/2021 - 11:29
From Vulnerable Plaque to Vulnerable Brain: Understanding the Role of Inflammation in Vascular Health, Stroke, and Cerebrovascular Disease

Theme: Beyond the Neuron: glia, vascular and immune cells

Title: From Vulnerable Plaque to Vulnerable Brain: Understanding the Role of Inflammation in Vascular Health, Stroke, and Cerebrovascular Disease

Abstract: Every year around 100,000 people in the UK will have a stroke. Stroke is a leading cause of adult disability, and cerebrovascular disease more broadly is a major cause of dementia. Understanding these diseases – both acute and chronic manifestations of cerebrovascular disease – requires consideration not only of the brain itself, but also the blood vessels supplying it. Atherosclerosis – the hardening of arteries as we age – may predispose to stroke by triggering the formation of blood clots that block the blood supply to the brain, but also involves inflammation that may cause chronic damage to the brain and prime both the brain and body for injury. Understanding this interaction between systemic disease and brain health may have important implications for our understanding of healthy ageing and provide novel therapeutic approaches for reducing the burden of cerebrovascular disease.

This talk will consider how advances in imaging may facilitate our understanding of the processes underlying atherosclerosis and how it affects the brain in stroke, as well as work currently underway to translate this understanding into improving treatments for stroke.

Biography: Dr Nicholas Evans is a Clinical Lecturer in Stroke Medicine at the University of Cambridge and a Consultant Stroke Physician at Addenbrooke’s Hospital. His primary research focus is on imaging atherosclerosis – the hardening of arteries due to cholesterol – using positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In particular, his research considers how inflammation within atherosclerosis of the carotid arteries affects atherosclerotic plaque stability to cause a stroke, as well as how this inflammation affects the brain. His work also considers how vascular disease relates to clinical frailty – a state of functional decline and loss of physiological reserves – and how this may affect responses to stroke therapies and outcomes. This research is a collaboration across the Departments of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine), Clinical Neurosciences, Geriatric Medicine, and Radiology within the School of Clinical Medicine.

His clinical training has included rotations within hospitals across the East of England, and he has undertaken postgraduate training at the University of Dundee and Harvard University. His PhD was supported by a Research Training Fellowship from The Dunhill Medical Trust. His work has been awarded the Harvey Prize for Vascular Medicine (Royal Society of Medicine), Binks Young Investigator Award (British Atherosclerosis Society), and a Quincentennial Lectureship (Royal College of Physicians), as well as awards from the British Geriatrics Society, Wellcome Trust, European Stroke Organisation, and the British Heart Foundation. He is a Junior Research Fellow at Wolfson College.

Register in advance for this meeting: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZIld-ispjkqHd0a54jud-hTVgYX8bT1qcvh

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Tue 01 Mar 16:00: Dr Yaara Erez - Title TBC

Wed, 22/09/2021 - 11:58
Dr Yaara Erez - Title TBC

Theme: Adaptive Brain Computations

Register in advance for this seminar: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZcuc-qsrDgpHdJ04bQqgIlvNreJgPWEHKl_

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Tue 08 Mar 16:00: Dr Petra Vértes - Title TBC

Wed, 22/09/2021 - 11:53
Dr Petra Vértes - Title TBC

Theme: Neurons, Networks and Circuits

Register in advance for this meeting: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZwsfuGpqjoiEtOhUKplx92IW5t-tiFiYHAv

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Tue 10 May 16:00: Professor Allan Herbison - Title TBC

Wed, 22/09/2021 - 11:49
Professor Allan Herbison - Title TBC

Theme: Neurons, Networks and Circuits

Register in advance for this meeting: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZIocuqgqz4qHNzVOj-fm9aeyHlEDnS8r1g6

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Tue 01 Feb 16:00: Dr Mirjana Bozic - Title TBC

Wed, 22/09/2021 - 11:43
Dr Mirjana Bozic - Title TBC

Theme: Social Brains and Communication

Register in advance for this seminar: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZYsfuypqDgqHNTwxL9Y84NXMhoM8LbO2Hzf

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Tue 07 Jun 16:00: Professor Sir Simon Baron Cohen - Title TBC

Wed, 22/09/2021 - 11:42
Professor Sir Simon Baron Cohen - Title TBC

Theme: Social Brains and Communication

Simon Baron-Cohen is a Professor in the Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry University of Cambridge and Fellow at Trinity College, Cambridge. He is Director of the Autism Research Centre in Cambridge. He is author of Mindblindness, The Essential Difference, Prenatal Testosterone in Mind, and Zero Degrees of Empathy. He has edited scholarly anthologies including Understanding Other Minds. He has written books for parents and teachers including Autism and Asperger Syndrome: The Facts. He is author of Mind Reading and The Transporters, digital educational resources to help children with autism learn emotion recognition, and both nominated for BAFTA awards.

He has published over 600 peer reviewed scientific articles, which have made contributions to many aspects of autism research, to typical cognitive sex differences, and synaesthesia research. Three influential theories he formulated were the ‘mindblindness’ theory of autism (1985), the ‘prenatal sex steroid’ theory of autism (1997), and the ‘empathizing-systemizing’ theory of typical sex differences (2002).

He created the first UK clinic for adults with suspected Asperger Syndrome (1999) that has helped over 1,000 patients to have their disability recognized. He gave a keynote address to the United Nations in New York on Autism Awareness Day 2017 on the topic of Autism and Human Rights. See http://webtv.un.org/meetings-events/watch/toward-autonomy-and-self-determination-world-autism-awareness-day-2017/5380816054001

He is a Fellow of the British Psychological Society, the British Academy, the Academy of Medical Sciences, and the American Psychological Association. He is Vice-President of the National Autistic Society, and was President of the International Society for Autism Research (INSAR, 2017-19). He was Chair of the NICE Guideline Development Group for Autism (Adults) and was Chair of the Psychology Section of the British Academy. He is co-editor in chief of the journal Molecular Autism and is a National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) Senior Investigator. He is the Principal Investigator of the Wellcome Trust funded award investigating the genetics of autism, in collaboration with the Sanger Centre.

He serves as Scientific Advisor, Trustee or Patron to several autism charities including the Autism Research Trust, the Cambridge Autism Centre of Excellence, and to the company Auticon, which only employs autistic people. He has taken part in many television documentaries, including the BBC ’s Horizon, and Employable Me. He received a knighthood in the New Year’s Honours List 2021. Register in advance for this seminar: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZEvfu-qrDkiGdL6aT2gBLASW6y5Z4S-sTHA

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Tue 16 Nov 16:00: Dr Fumiya Iida - Title TBC

Tue, 21/09/2021 - 12:23
Dr Fumiya Iida - Title TBC

Theme: Brains and Machines

Register in advance for this meeting: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZItcOCrrTIjHd1bpKQuRLjY8jfXlTlC516E

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Tue 30 Nov 16:00: Professor Giovanna Mallucci - Title TBC

Tue, 21/09/2021 - 12:23
Professor Giovanna Mallucci - Title TBC

Theme: Lifelong Brain Development

Register in advance for this seminar: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZUlcOyrqz4sHNF7X-tDcPRvZLJTs-CBz6AW

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Tue 01 Feb 16:00: Dr Mirjana Bozic - Title TBC

Tue, 21/09/2021 - 12:23
Dr Mirjana Bozic - Title TBC

Theme: Social Brains and Communication

Register in advance for this seminar: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZYsfuypqDgqHNTwxL9Y84NXMhoM8LbO2Hzf

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Tue 08 Feb 16:00: Dr Michael Hastings - Title TBC

Tue, 21/09/2021 - 12:23
Dr Michael Hastings - Title TBC

Theme: Adaptive Brain Computations

Register in advance for this seminar: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZcrcuqsrjIoHdda7Yz5HR16WmvNzejWhW_1

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Tue 02 Nov 16:00: Dr Giles Yeo - Title TBC

Tue, 21/09/2021 - 12:23
Dr Giles Yeo - Title TBC

Theme: Beyond the Neuron: glia, vascular and immune cells

Biography: Giles Yeo MBE is a Principal Research Associate at MRC Metabolic Diseases Unit and a Scientific Director of the Genomics/Transcriptomics Core at the University of Cambridge.

He was born in London and lived in Singapore, San Francisco, United States, and since 1994 has been based in Cambridge, United Kingdom. In 1994 he graduated from University of California, Berkeley (Molecular and Cell Biology) and in 1997 he completed a PhD study at University of Cambridge (Molecular genetics).His focus is on the study of obesity, brain control of body weight and genetic influences on appetitive behaviour. He has presented three BBC Horizon documentaries: Why are we getting so fat (2016), Clean Eating: The Dirty Truth (2017) and Vitamin Pills: Miracle or Myth? (2018). Giles was also a presenter on BBC Two’s Trust Me, I’m A Doctor. His first book, ‘Gene Eating: The Story Of Human Appetite’ was published in Dec 2018. His second book, ‘Why Calories Don’t Count’ was published in June 2021.

Register in advance for this seminar: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZwpd-GvrTgiGNyaXkRh-8ixF0bI9ayS-CBr

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Tue 09 Nov 16:00: Dr Duncan Astle - Title TBC

Tue, 21/09/2021 - 12:23
Dr Duncan Astle - Title TBC

Theme: Lifelong Brain Development

Register in advance for this seminar: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZMpfu2hqzItEtCynH1goRGoGVVywItdgKrJ

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Tue 18 Jan 16:00: Dr Sara Baker - Title TBC

Tue, 21/09/2021 - 12:23
Dr Sara Baker - Title TBC

Theme: Lifelong Brain Development

Register in advance for this seminar: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZIkdeCgrTgsH9QZXoxHMJmBNUWNOmw7GxBW

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Tue 26 Apr 16:00: Professor Jeff Dalley - Title TBC

Tue, 21/09/2021 - 12:23
Professor Jeff Dalley - Title TBC

Theme: Adaptive Brain Computations

Register in advance for this seminar: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZYrc-CurzksGtzEOu_NDZoaMd0F99JK4wa_

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Tue 05 Oct 16:00: Dr Nicholas Evans - Title TBC

Tue, 21/09/2021 - 12:23
Dr Nicholas Evans - Title TBC

Theme: Beyond the Neuron: glia, vascular and immune cells

Register in advance for this meeting: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZIld-ispjkqHd0a54jud-hTVgYX8bT1qcvh

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
 
 
1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
5
 
6
 
7
 
8
 
9
 
10
 
11
 
12
 
13
 
14
 
15
 
16
 
17
 
18
 
19
 
20
 
21
 
22
 
23
 
24
 
25
 
26
 
27
 
28
 
29
 
30
 
 
 
 

Cambridge Memory Meeting 2015

Read more >