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Translational Cognitive Neuroscience Lab

 
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A superlist combining individual seminars and series from other lists on talks.cam. These Neuroscience-themed seminars will be advertised throughout the relevant interest group in Cambridge.
Updated: 28 min 35 sec ago

Fri 11 Feb 16:00: Vascular adenylyl cyclase: New roles for an old enzyme

Sat, 15/01/2022 - 06:23
Vascular adenylyl cyclase: New roles for an old enzyme

Abstract not available

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Tue 18 Oct 16:00: Zero to Birth: How the Human Brain is Built

Fri, 14/01/2022 - 16:44
Zero to Birth: How the Human Brain is Built

Theme: Lifelong Brain Development

In this special session, Author Bill Harris talks about his new book “Zero to Birth: How the Human Brain is Built”

By the time a baby is born, its brain is equipped with tens of billions of intricately crafted neurons wired together to form a compact and breathtakingly efficient supercomputer. The book is meant to give a broad audience (i.e. non-neuroscientists) a sense of the step-by-step construction of a human brain as well as our current conceptual understanding of various processes involved. The book also hopes to highlight relevance of brain development to our growing understanding of cognitive and psychological variations and syndromes. The author will talk about the book including the many challenges and rewards involved in writing it.

Biography: Bill is a retired Developmental Neurobiologist, Emeritus Professor of Anatomy at the University of Cambridge and a previous Co-Director of Cambridge Neuroscience.

Register in advance for this seminar: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZAqf-uhqDgjEtV9IGJupzFgKdKDD434wR0W

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Tue 18 Oct 16:00: Zero to Birth: How the Human Brain is Built

Fri, 14/01/2022 - 16:42
Zero to Birth: How the Human Brain is Built

Theme: Lifelong Brain Development

In this special session, Author Bill Harris talks about his new book “Zero to Birth: How the Human Brain is Built”

By the time a baby is born, its brain is equipped with tens of billions of intricately crafted neurons wired together to form a compact and breathtakingly efficient supercomputer. The book is meant to give a broad audience (i.e. non-neuroscientists) a sense of the step-by-step construction of a human brain as well as our current conceptual understanding of various processes involved. The book also hopes to highlight relevance of brain development to our growing understanding of cognitive and psychological variations and syndromes. The author will talk about the book including the many challenges and rewards involved in writing it.

Register in advance for this seminar: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZAqf-uhqDgjEtV9IGJupzFgKdKDD434wR0W

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

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Tue 01 Mar 16:00: Dr Yaara Erez - Title TBC

Fri, 14/01/2022 - 15:17
Dr Yaara Erez - Title TBC

Theme: Adaptive Brain Computations

Register in advance for this seminar: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZcuc-qsrDgpHdJ04bQqgIlvNreJgPWEHKl_

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Tue 08 Feb 16:00: Why is the suprachiasmatic nucleus such a brilliant circadian time-keeper?

Fri, 14/01/2022 - 14:59
Why is the suprachiasmatic nucleus such a brilliant circadian time-keeper?

Theme: Adaptive Brain Computations

Circadian clocks dominate our lives. By creating and distributing an internal representation of 24-hour solar time, they prepare us, and thereby adapt us, to the daily and seasonal world. Jet-lag is an obvious indicator of what can go wrong when such adaptation is disrupted acutely. More seriously, the growing prevalence of rotational shift-work which runs counter to our circadian life, is a significant chronic challenge to health, presenting as increased incidence of systemic conditions such as metabolic and cardiovascular disease. Added to this, circadian and sleep disturbances are a recognised feature of various neurological and psychiatric conditions, and in some cases may contribute to disease progression. The “head ganglion” of the circadian system is the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. It synchronises the, literally, innumerable cellular clocks across the body, to each other and to solar time. Isolated in organotypic slice culture, it can maintain precise, high-amplitude circadian cycles of neural activity, effectively, indefinitely, just as it does in vivo. How is this achieved: how does this clock in a dish work? This presentation will consider SCN time-keeping at the level of molecular feedback loops, neuropeptidergic networks and neuron-astrocyte interactions.

Biography: Michael Hastings graduated from the University of Liverpool (1977) with a BSc in Marine Biology. For his PhD in Marine Ecology, again at Liverpool, he studied tidal and lunar rhythms in intertidal crustaceans (1980). After a PGCE in Manchester (1981) he took a post-doc with Joe Herbert in the Department of Anatomy, University of Cambridge to investigate the role of melatonin and circadian clocks in seasonal fertility of mammals. He was appointed to a Junior Lectureship (Demonstratorship) in Anatomy in 1984, and became a Lecturer in 1988 establishing his own laboratory in circadian and seasonal neuroscience. He was a Fellow & College Lecturer at Queens’ College, Cambridge (1987-1990). His research interests moved towards the neurobiology of circadian clocks, with a focus on entrainment of the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the brain’s principal pacemaker, and he was appointed Reader in Neuroscience in 1998. In 2001 he left the University to become a Programme Leader in Circadian Neurobiology at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge. This enabled him to develop a molecular genetic approach to elucidate the mechanisms of circadian time-keeping in mammals. In October 2013 he joined Michel Goedert as Joint Head of the Neurobiology Division, and become sole Head of Division in May 2016 (to present). In 2008 he was Elected to Fellowship of the Academy of Medical Sciences and also elected as President of the Society for Research on Biological Rhythms. In 2010 he was elected to Fellowship of the Royal Society. He has served on the Society for Neuroscience Program Committee, various Royal Society committees and the MRC Neurosciences and Mental Health Board (2016- 21). He holds an Honorary Professorship in the Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience in the University

Register in advance for this seminar: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZcrcuqsrjIoHdda7Yz5HR16WmvNzejWhW_1

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Thu 20 Jan 12:00: "Can we improve human nerve regeneration?”

Fri, 14/01/2022 - 12:50
"Can we improve human nerve regeneration?”

Join Zoom Meeting https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86408242174?pwd=dEszT1YxS1hROVdHOVpPdWV1SURBUT09

Meeting ID: 864 0824 2174 Passcode: 713071

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Tue 24 May 16:00: Professor James Rowe - Title TBC

Fri, 14/01/2022 - 12:30
Professor James Rowe - Title TBC

Theme: Neurons, Networks and Circuits

Register in advance for this meeting: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZEkf-ytrTMpHtyslXurEA70Si2DNnwZsWag

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Mon 24 Jan 15:30: The ADHD polygenic score Please note that this talk is taking place from 3.30pm-4.30pm UK Time

Thu, 13/01/2022 - 14:26
The ADHD polygenic score

In this talk, I will consider how recent advances in genetic research are improving understanding of neurodevelopment. I will focus on findings from a recent systematic review of the literature on the polygenic score for ADHD . I will interrogate to what degree the polygenic score for ADHD is helping to advance knowledge in basic research. I will consider the parallels and differences between a polygenic score and other sources of information currently used in medical practice, such as family history. The strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats underlying the application of polygenic scores will be discussed.

Angelica Ronald is Professor of Psychology and Genetics at the Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development, Birkbeck, University of London, where she co-directs the Genes Environment Lifespan laboratory and the BRIDGE wet lab. She gained postdoctoral training in molecular genetics funded by an Autism Speaks fellowship and a PhD in Quantitative Genetics from King’s College London. Prior to that she received her BA from the University of Oxford in Experimental Psychology. Professor Ronald has 19 years’ experience of large-scale research with a focus on genetic and environmental causes of neurodevelopment and mental health in children and adolescence. Her research includes the first study to show high genetic overlap between autism and ADHD in childhood, and the first genome-wide association study of autistic traits. Her recent research has included large-scale meta-genome-wide association analyses of cohorts such as TEDS , ALSPAC and CATSS . She is co-I of Babytwins Study Sweden, a 5-year study of infant twins assessed on an extensive neurocognitive battery. Her research prizes include the Association for Psychological Sciences Janet Taylor Spence award and the British Psychological Society Spearman medal. Prof Ronald has >110 publications, is a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science and is joint editor of the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, ranked top in the field of developmental psychology (ISI). She co-founded the London Genetics Network, a new hub funded by the Genetics Society involving over 30 institutions and 300 members. The network aims to increase collaboration, support for early career researchers and skill sharing in human genetic research in and around London.

Please note that this talk is taking place from 3.30pm-4.30pm UK Time

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Thu 03 Feb 12:30: Title to be confirmed

Thu, 13/01/2022 - 13:32
Title to be confirmed

Abstract not available

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Thu 27 Jan 12:30: The phenotypic expression of neuropsychiatric copy number variants

Thu, 13/01/2022 - 13:29
The phenotypic expression of neuropsychiatric copy number variants

Abstract Large, rare copy number variants (CNVs) are associated with neurodevelopmental disorders such as intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder. However, it is possible to carry one of these CNVs and to be less severely affected, perhaps even to appear unaffected. There is a lack of evidence on the phenotypic effects of neurodevelopmental CNVs in this group. I will be presenting work on the effects of neurodevelopmental CNVs in cognitive and psychiatric domains in individuals without overt neurodevelopmental disorders. I’ll also be speaking about returning CNV results to research participants and future directions for translation.

Biography Dr Kimberley Kendall, (BSc Hons MBB Ch MRC Psych PhD) is an academic and general adult psychiatry trainee from South Wales. She studied medical genetics and medicine at Cardiff University, and later completed her PhD on neurodevelopmental copy number variants at the MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, Cardiff. Dr Kendall’s clinical work is currently in rehabilitation psychiatry and assertive outreach, and work mostly with individuals with psychotic disorders. Her research interests are in how we can use psychiatric genetic findings to improve patient care. For more information on Dr Kendall, please visit: https://www.cardiff.ac.uk/people/view/126462-kendall-kimberley

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Thu 20 Jan 12:30: Why it’s inconceivable that Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde are one and the same: How emotion influences similarity perception

Thu, 13/01/2022 - 13:27
Why it’s inconceivable that Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde are one and the same: How emotion influences similarity perception

Abstract Similarity between experiences is key to meaning-making processes, such as categorisation, generalisation, and inference; it also influences how we encode and remember. Emotional similarity refers to the tendency to group stimuli together because they evoke the same feelings. Events that look different and have different semantic meanings can nevertheless evoke the same feelings. We may judge an image of a homeless person and an image of a person injured in a car accident as different, because they have different meanings, or as similar, because both evoke negative feelings. In this talk I will discuss the effect of emotion on similarity perception, as measured in behaviour and in the brain through representational neural similarity.

Biography Dr Deborah Talmi is a cognitive neuroscientist, interested in emotional cognition – the effect that emotional value has on our cognitive system. The core of her research is the emotional value of the events that we experience. To induce emotional value in the lab she uses monetary reward, pain and taste stimuli, and pictures that depict distressing scenes. Her aim is to understand how our brains convert such input to neural representation of value and subjective feelings. Her main focus is on how the emotional value of experience influences later memory for these experiences. For more detail on Dr Talmi, please visit: https://www.lucy.cam.ac.uk/fellows/dr-deborah-talmi

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Tue 18 Jan 16:00: Common elements: An innovative methodology for identifying effective interventions in early childhood education

Wed, 12/01/2022 - 21:09
Common elements: An innovative methodology for identifying effective interventions in early childhood education

Theme: Lifelong Brain Development

Evidence-based education programmes, like many clinical interventions, are multi-faceted and can be expensive to implement. In this talk I will describe an alternative: distilling the common elements across many evidence-based programmes. Published programme manuals are selected through systematic review, then extensively coded and cross-referenced. Finally, the common elements that emerge are shared with practitioners as part of a ‘library’ of practices (rather than a holistic programme manual).

Although the common elements methodology has been used in the prevention and intervention sciences, this project reflects the first attempt at applying this approach to early childhood education.

I will describe the common elements methods and preliminary findings from our Nuffield-funded project, in collaboration with the Early Intervention Foundation. I will discuss the challenges and opportunities we have encountered, alongside our strategies for sharing evidence with practitioners in a digestible way.

Register in advance for this seminar: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZIkdeCgrTgsH9QZXoxHMJmBNUWNOmw7GxBW

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Fri 11 Mar 17:00: Title to be confirmed Annual David James Lecture 2021-2022, Department of Pharmacology

Wed, 12/01/2022 - 11:37
Title to be confirmed

Abstract not available

Annual David James Lecture 2021-2022, Department of Pharmacology

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Fri 04 Mar 16:00: Title to be confirmed

Wed, 12/01/2022 - 11:34
Title to be confirmed

Abstract not available

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Fri 11 Feb 16:00: Title to be confirmed

Wed, 12/01/2022 - 11:30
Title to be confirmed

Abstract not available

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Fri 04 Feb 16:00: The Dynamic Spatial Organisation Of The Cell

Wed, 12/01/2022 - 11:27
The Dynamic Spatial Organisation Of The Cell

Abstract not available

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Cambridge Memory Meeting 2015

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